Decluttering my Notes on Evernote

Decluttering my Notes on Evernote

I’ve been using Evernote for almost 10 years now!
And because of a job change I was unable to use the desktop version on my computer so I started looking for alternatives. I tried Evernote Web at the time (this was last year) but the web version was full of bugs and many Evernote’s functionalities weren’t available yet. It was frustrating to try to use the web version.

So I started using Microsoft’s Onenote and I kinda liked it at the beginning. I enjoyed the notebooks structure without tags. And that actually made me realize that my Evernote tagging/notebook system was over complicated!

Recently, with the new web version and the ability that I have now to use the Evernote desktop version on my work computer, I decided to get back to the green elephant.

So a great decluttering began and it’s still ongoing…

My idea is to have a few generic tags and use notebooks for the major structure (just like Onenote). I think it’s easier to just file a note in a dedicated notebook than processing it and choosing tags. Tags can become very messy and out of control! And that’s exactly how my system is now! Totally out of control. So many random tags!

I’ll not use so many tags for references anymore. The search function on Evernote is so good that I don’t need perfectly organized tags.

I have notes that were automatically generated (using IFTTT) of every post I published on Instagram. I’ve deleted my Instagram a while ago already (and I have a backup of the pictures I posted). So I’ll delete a notebook called “Timeline” with 292 notes generated from Instagram in it.

This cleaning process will take a while. I’l handle the big ticket items first (like the Timeline notebook).

Deep inside I think I want a brand new Evernote account. Clean slate. Start again. So, that’s it! Purging mode on! I’ll make Evernote as clean as I can.

I also have some old notes from the time I used Evernote as my GTD system (including To-do lists), and I have notes for each action I had to do and now it’s completely useless. I’ll delete them all.

#evernote #organization #notes

Tigana: What is a name?

Tigana: What is a name?

Tigana was written by the Canadian author Guy Gavriel Kay in 1990. It was the first time I read one of his books. Kay is known for his fantasy fiction that resembles real historic places and even historical events, but transformed into fantasy. It seems like alternate history with fantasy elements in it. Tigana has lots of fantasy elements but I read that Kay’s earlier books gravitate more towards alternate history.

Tigana is a stand alone fantasy novel which is extremely rare these days. It tells the tale of a people that lost their identity since their kingdom was conquered by two powerful tyrant Wizards. It’s a story about lost names and culture and how a group of brave rebels prepared themselves over years to overthrow the tyrants and reclaim their homeland. The two tyrants split the kingdom into two and one of the provinces was put under a spell to basically transform it into another place and make its past forgotten.

It’s a slow burn story that develops leisurely and in an almost dream like state. The writing is poetic, almost to the point where it is too flowery, but then it isn’t. Some chapters are a deep dive into the characters memories and emotions that later helps us understand their motivations and their actions. The characters are not good nor bad. There is ambiguity in their actions. Even the tyrant wizard Brandin is portrayed as a conflicted villain and at times he seems unsure about his decisions. But for me, he is evil.

There is a lot of world building and it almost feels like the world he created could exist on its own and many other tales could be told about it. The newest editions of the book have a foreword in which the author explains his Italian inspiration for the Peninsula of the Palm. The author was inspired by the Italian Renaissance history. The powerful wizard Brandin of Ygrath was inspired by a proud and arrogant Borgia or Medici of the 1500’s.

Best and worst characters:

  • Best character: I loved Catriana, the red head woman who is brave and basically makes the story less boring.
  • Second best character: Devin, the bard/singer.
  • Worst character: Dianora, who lived in the saishan (kind of a harem) with the wizard Brandon. She wanted to defeat him but Stockholm’s Syndrome got her and she just couldn’t do anything against him.

My thoughts

I enjoyed it but it’s not on my “best books of the year list”. I thought the pace was too slow. Until 40% of the book we just get background story and not much action. Not really my cup of tea. But the writing is beautiful. Not sure if I’m going to read another book from this author.

The book

#books #bookreview #reading

My notes on “Notes on a Nervous Planet”

My notes on “Notes on a Nervous Planet”

I really enjoyed this book by Matt Haig. It’s part memoir, part essay, part blog post.

First of all, the author does a great job at narrating it. It felt like I was having a conversation as I nodded and sighed at various passages.
His personal stories add a lot of depth to the discussion: how can we be sane in a world that bombards us with information.

It’s a call to quieter lifestyle and makes us think about our standard behaviors. And it’s all in the little things: watch the stars, observe the clouds, listen to the birds, read a book, appreciate music, have a conversation in person without looking at your phone.
Beautiful writing!

I loved a chapter where he talks about books and reading:

“Reading isn’t important because it helps to get you a job. It’s important because it gives you room to exist beyond the reality you’re given. It is how humans merge. How minds connect. Dreams. Empathy. Understanding. Escape. Reading is love in action.”
― Matt Haig, Notes on a Nervous Planet

And there is a look of talk about self image which is particularly relevant in today’s Instagram’s selfies:

“Remember no one really cares what you look like. They care what they look like. You are the only person in the world to have worried about your face.”
― Matt Haig, Notes on a Nervous Planet

It was a refreshing read (or should I say “listen”?). It’s about living. And being happy. And embracing what is important. Letting go of the burden.

The book:
Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig
Published January 29th 2019 by Penguin Books (first published July 5th 2018

#book #bookreview #reading

Being outside biking

We had a sunny and warm day today!
I think it was the first warm of the year, actually. First weekend with temperatures above 25 degrees Celsius.
There was one thing I’ve been wanting to do for more than a year now: go bike in one of the roads they close on Sunday mornings.
I finally did it and it was great!
I knew I was bit out of shape to go for long bike rides so 20km was just about right.
Good day!

Sunday bike ride

#bikeride #personal

What I read in May 2019

What I read in May 2019

1) Rogue Protocol (The Murderbot Diaries, #3) by Martha Wells

  • Another adventure with the anti-social murder bot. It is full of action inside enclosed spaces and lots of hearing other people’s feeds. An enjoyable read, as always.

2) The Armored Saint (The Sacred Throne, #1) by Myke Cole

  • This was a dark-grim book! Darker than I expected.
    The horror is raw and gory. It’s a harsh world with a religious fanatic Order, tyranny and dominated people. I was expecting lighter moments throughout the story but I would definitely consider it dark fantasy. Not really my cup of tea.

3) Burnout: The Secret to Unlocking the Stress Cycle by Emily Nagoski, Amelia Nagoski

  • I loved the idea of “ending the stress cycle” and learning the differences between the stressors and the stress itself. Exercise (aka moving our bodies) is one of the best ways to discharge and close the stress cycle. With this book I realized how and why exercise is essential to my well-being. I always knew but I’ve never linked it directly to the stress cycle.

4) Saga, Vol. 1 & Vol. 2 by Brian K. Vaughan (Writer), Fiona Staples (Artist)

  • There’s no way you can’t love the characters. It’s just mindbogglingly full of creativity, emotion and authenticity. I read volumes 1 & 2 for a Bookclub meeting, which was awesome! I will continue reading the series for sure.

6) OneNote: OneNote User Guide to Getting Things Done: Setup OneNote for GTD in 5 Easy Steps by Jack Echo

  • This one helped me review some of he keys points on how to use Onenote. I’ve been using Evernote for more than 10 years now and I decided to move to Onenote. I like the flexibility, the “white canvas” space that Onenote offers. I learned some useful keyboard shortcuts and hidden option with this book.

#readinglist #books

Too many windows open and too much clutter

I started reading Notes on a Nervous Planet by Matt Haig and it is full of good stuff like this:

“I sometimes feel like my head is a computer with too many windows open. Too much clutter on the desktop. There is a metaphorical spinning rainbow wheel inside me. Disabling me. And if only I could find a way to switch off some of the frames, if only I could drag some of the clutter into the trash, then I would be fine. But which frame would I choose, when they all seem so essential? How can I stop my mind being overloaded when the world is overloaded? We can think about anything. And so it makes sense that we end up thinking about everything. We might have to, sometimes, be brave enough to switch the screens off in order to switch ourselves back on. To disconnect in order to reconnect.”
― Matt Haig, Notes on a Nervous Planet

via @goodreads

#books #quote #overload #reconnect