Infomocracy by Malka Ann Older and democracy flavors

Infomocracy (The Centenal Cycle, #1)Infomocracy by Malka Ann Older
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This one is very social-political with interesting ideas of a different flavor of democracy.

In a near future there are no countries as we have today, but rather groups of 100,000 people that make up a “centenal”. So while walking around you can cross various “centenals” on you path. Each “centenal” has its own political party. The political parties are like global governments, they can rule various centenals at the same time. Every 10 years there is a global election in which citizens choose their centenals governments. The most voted government becomes “The Supermajority”, but I could not understand exactly what is its power or its role in the global decision making process. It seemed a super important position to fight for, tho (maybe I have to read the next book in the series to find out).

Also, there’s “Information”, a large nonprofit organization that controls and vets what information people can access on their handhelds. I couldn’t help but think of Google. What if Google became a non-profit that everybody accepts as the only source of news, navigation maps, encyclopedia, social communication tools? That’s what’s going on here.

So there is espionage, political campaigns, activism and information censorship. Discussions about the elections process, democracy, monopolies, immigration, disinformation control, minorities representation, war, technology.

There is commentary about the Internet and how it transforms into an essential part of everybody’s life. How it is a tool to keep the system running and how it could be used to manipulate and control. Something that is actually disturbingly close to our present situation.

It’s a huge thought experiment on democracy and representation. We follow various characters, each one working for a different political government, or for Information, or just rebels that want to break down the system.

I thought the book was not so action-packed as I would like, but the thought-provoking ideas were worth the read!

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The end of Saga: Vol 09 (for now…)

The end of Saga: Vol 09 (for now…) Saga, Vol. 9 (Saga, #9)Saga, Vol. 9 by Brian K. Vaughan
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Apparently this is the last volume before the authors go on a hiatus. It’s heartbreaking because it doesn’t end anywhere near a happy note. The whole series I’ve known that the world of Saga is cruel and violent. I got the message. After seeing the main characters survive the most horrible situations I was not prepared for this ending. I don’t want to believe. And that’s how good this series is. I care about every character. Even the bad ones. Ok, not all the bad ones.
Hopefully we will see the continuation of the story soon!

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Saga Volume 7

Saga Volume 7

A reunification, someone gets high and have stupid ideas, a longer than expected stopover on a comet-planet settlement and more awesome (meaning pleasantly weird) alien species.
A family still trying to just…survive in a crazy world where appearances and race matter more than it needs to.

This series only gets better and better. Two more to go!

#saga #graphicnovel #reading

Are our brains being hacked?

I ask that because I noticed one day I was working extremely focused. The whole day. My working hours were highly productive. I was in a state of flow. It felt good. And that meant I didn’t check social media. I checked my personal e-mail only 3 times the whole day. It was one of my most productive days in months!

And when I got home in the evening I sat down to read a book. And I just couldn’t focus! I couldn’t get past the first sentence. My mind was searching for something. CRAVING for something. And 15 minutes later of reading the same sentence over and over I realized I wanted to check news. Updates. New information!

It seemed like my brain needed stimulation before doing focussed work again. Does that mean I got addicted to the dopamine release related to the social media usage?
I got my mobile phone and looked at the shiny screen…
…I opened Twitter, but there nothing much there anymore.
…2 minutes later I checked my 2 e-mails accounts. Nothing of importance.
…5 minutes later I checked Whatsapp and Telegram. Read all the messages. Nothing major to reply.
…10 minutes later I opened the Discord app. Read all the messages of the groups I currently participate on. Didn’t need to reply anything. Done.

And then I was good to get back to my book.

There is one good thing happening here: none of the apps that I looked into had an endless timeline. Twitter could potentially have the never ending scrolling feed but I only follow 9 accounts there, so nothing much to see. And so I spent 17 minutes checking my “feeds”, which is not much considering that in the past I used to be sucked into the Facebook feed for hours.

I think I’m making progress…

But I still think my brain is not the same.
Why did I had this urge to check any of those apps?
I felt like a lab rat pulling the lever to get some food.

Weird… I wonder if I will ever get rid of this brain hack.

#socialmedia #addiction

What I read in July 2019

What I read in July 2019
  1. Vessel by Lisa A. Nichols: A woman astronaut temporarily lost in space during a mission comes back to Earth 10 years later and weird things happen. It’s loose on sci-fi, NASA makes unlikely decisions and I’m not sure I bought into the reason why the astronaut was having these mysterious experiences.
  2. Saga, Vol. 4 by Brian K. Vaughan (Writer), Fiona Staples (Artist): I’m hooked! Will read the entire series.
  3. Saga, Vol. 5 by Brian K. Vaughan (Writer), Fiona Staples (Artist): Best quote from this one: “Together, my parents had learned to be much more than “the sum of their parts”, whatever that means. Separately, they were kind of just a mess.” I already got Vols. 6 and 7 lined up!
  4. Exit Strategy (The Murderbot Diaries #4) by Martha Wells: The bot that hacked it’s governor module becomes more independent and becomes more human-like, without even wanting to, I’d say. It’s so familiar to know that all that Murderbot wants in life is to watch more media. But at the same time, Murderbot can’t stay away from its ex-owner problems and goes into a complicated rescue mission.
  5. BrainChains: Discover your brain, to unleash its full potential in a hyperconnected, multitasking world by Theo Compernolle: It’s full of scientific research reference and it can get repetitive. It talks a lot about the disadvantages of using e-mail, stress, multitasking, texting while driving and the importance of rest. Good message but I think the book could be shorter.
  6. Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari: Made me wonder about tomorrow but question if I really want to be transformed into a stream of data to live forever.

#readinglist #books #reading

Rediscovering GTD: the journey

Rediscovering GTD: the journey

My GTD organization has been a moving target for years.
GTD – Getting Things Done is a productivity method created by David Allen and I’ve been more or less applying its principles to my life for almost 6 years now.

7 months ago I wrote about sticking with one productivity system. At that point I had just started using Trello as my main app, applying Kanban principles and leaving Todoist behind.

But why?

Well, about a year ago my lists were overwhelming, I was trying to create filters in Todoist and apply the Eisenhower Matrix and it was a complete mess!

I started reading about Kanban and thought that that would be a good change for my organization system. Kanban is all about process and visualizing the work. It was created by Toyota as a scheduling system for cars lean manufacturing. Over the years it became a project management tool designed to help visualize work, limit work-in-progress, and maximize efficiency. Trello is a popular app that applies the Kanban board principles and it’s extremely user friendly.

I started using Trello and I liked it for a while. But I felt it lacked agility. See, I use GTD as a productivity method (which is list based) and Kanban is based on boards with focus of process flow. Using Kanban made me understand my process but adding next actions and processing them in Trello was too cumbersome. I spent more time organizing and making the system look beautiful than actually doing stuff. Trello is an amazing visual tool!

But after a few months with Trello I decided to go minimal. I understood the Kanban’s basic concepts of “backlog”, “doing” and “done” and I wanted a simple straightforward system but that still had some GTD structure.

I remembered testing an app called Nirvana HQ that was strictly based on GTD. So I started using Nirvana HQ again, which is a lovely app! It’s perfect for GTD and it’s the best digital implementation of GTD I’ve ever seen. Elegant, simple, to the point.
But there is not much customization you can make on the app and it’s lots of whites and light greys. Not too exciting. And there is almost none integration to other apps. It’s extremely bare bones.

Nirvana H

So after using Nirvana HQ in a minimal style I understood once more what GTD is all about. I had one of those Ah-Ha! moments just looking at Nirvana’s left menu. This menu is basically:

  • Inbox
  • Next
  • Waiting
  • Scheduled
  • Someday

And that’s GTD in a nutshell. Inbox collects any incoming information, Next is whatever needs to be done as soon as possible, Waiting are for things we are waiting for, Scheduled are things incubated that we will take a look in future date and Someday is for everything not current or not active in our defined time frame.

That’s the basics for GTD and on top of that we can create more granular lists with contexts, like: @home, @work, @errands, @calls, etc.

I discovered I don’t need too many contexts (@home, @work, @errands, @calls is all I need) and that a simple Next Actions list differentiating between Personal and Work areas of focus are enough for me.

Enter Todoist + Evernote (again)

I’ve decided to (ironically) go back to using Evernote and Todoist.

I’ve been an Evernote member since July 31st, 2010!
That’s a lot of time!
And when I decided this year to move to Onenote I exported the most important notes but basically left everything else in Evernote. I told myself I would reorganize, review and gradually move everything to Onenote (which never happened, all the old notes are still there).

The only reason I moved to Onenote was that at my new workplace I couldn’t install Evernote for desktop and Evernote’s web version was horrible. Now, a year later, Evernote Web has become quite similar to the desktop experience and I discovered last month that I could (finally) install Evernote on my work desktop. I don’t know what happened, but I got to the Windows Store and I could install and launch Evernote without any trouble.

So… I’m moving back to Evernote and Todoist!

I think I’ve been a Todoist user since 2016. It has been evolving since I saw it the first time and I was surprised to find out now that it only got better during all this time.
It’s sleek, simple and works well on all platforms. I did move my tasks from Nirvana to Todoist quite quickly because it provides a frictionless way of adding anything to its Inbox.

Todoist in July 2019

And this the list setup I’m now using on Todoist:

What about Nirvana HQ? (which is still awesome!)

So why I left Nirvana HQ?

I still think some Calendar reminders, specially for milestones, are useful to my workflow. The secret to not be overwhelmed using GTD is not going crazy scheduling all the tasks we see and adding them to a Calendar or adding dates in to-do list app. That will make the system extremely cluttered and you’ll discover that you underestimated the amount of tasks you accomplish in a single day. We are not good at estimating how much time a task will take.

So, only things that are taking place in space and time should go to the Calendar. Hard due dates can go to the Calendar or can be added a date in a To-Do. And that’s about it!
All the remaining tasks are simply: Next Actions. No hard due dates.

So Nirvana HQ made me understand this. Made me believe I don’t need to add a date to everything. If you’ve ever used Todoist or any other To-Do list app you know they are basically built on dates. They encourage you to put a date on every single task.

So Nirvana HQ is great if you just want neatly well organized GTD lists.
But if you’re like me who likes to have an integrated system with options to go to the Calendar, set reminders, link projects to notes… well, then Nirvana HQ might be a little bit disappointing. Also, I need this whole system to work in sync on at least 2 computers and my phone.

It’s all about being comfortable with the tools

Going back and forth using all these tools made me understand a little bit more about myself. It’s a process and whatever organization system is being used, some trial and error will always happen.

Some people will live happily without any need to organize ideas and actions in a board or to-do list. I’m not one of them. Lists and writing down ideas is essential to my well being.

One of the positive aspects of GTD is that it can be applied in any tool, it can be paper based and it can be as simple or as complex as you want it to be. You just have to understand the principles.

#productivity #GTD #trello #kanban #Todoist #NirvanaHQ